Welcome to Kibera, Nairobi

I arrived in Nairobi early morning Sunday July 15 from Delhi. I’m here for 2.5 months working with Kounkuey Design Initiative, a design firm specializing in design of productive public spaces with communities. I’m working as an engineering intern with KDI in Kibera, one of Africa’s largest slums, with an estimated 300,000 to 1,000,000 million residents. Kiberan residents lack access to many basic public services. With KDI, I’m helping design community infrastructure in public spaces along the Ngong River that runs through the slum. KDI has completed two projects in Kibera to date, the third is now in construction, the fourth is now in the design phase.

 

The railway through Kibera serves as a main throughway for walking.

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Most Kiberan residents live in small structures made of mud-wood walls and tin roofs. Many residents rent their homes.

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Kounkuey’s Kibera Public Space Project 03 is in the process of going up. Here is the multi-purpose structure in construction.

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Site 3 view between the multipurpose structure and bridge.

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The bricks are stackable without need for mortar above the first course. There is a channel on the top of each brick on which the next brick layer rests.

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Houses around site 3.

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One of the concrete building columns on the multi-purpose building was tilted, so down it came, one strike at a time.

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A young boy hanging around site 3.

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The site 3 playground is completed and in use.

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Walking up the pathway from site 3 back into central Kibera.

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The rusted metal roofs are ubiquitous in Kibera.

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Waste dumping site in Kibera, much enjoyed by Kibera’s healthy goats.

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The Ngong River runs black in Kibera.

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